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Happy Home Care Aide Week!

Monday , November 9 , 2020

Happy Home Care Aide Week!

Every November, the home care community honors the millions of home care aides, nurses, therapists, and social workers who make a difference for the patients and families they serve.

This week, November 9 – 13, we recognize home care aides in particular. At ComForCare, our aides play an invaluable role to our clients as caregivers, companions, and friends. They choose to use their lives to serve our community’s aged, disabled, and dying. In these unprecedented times, more than ever before, they are heroes.

Here’s a little more about what they do every day:

What is Home Care? 

Home care includes a wide range of professional services, such as medical or social support, that allow a person to live safely in their home. These services are provided by nurses, home health aides, therapists, and more.

No work is nobler, and no group is more deserving of our respect and admiration. Their goal is helping society’s weakest members live the fullest lives they can. By marrying high tech with high touch, home care professionals and volunteers allow patients to get care at home where they can be with the ones they love.” – The National Association for Home Care & Hospice

The focus of home care is often helping someone who is aging and needs assistance to live independently, is recuperating from an illness or injury, or is managing chronic health issues.

The services are almost always a more budget-friendly option than high-cost institutional care that would be provided in a nursing facility.

Why Use Home Health Care?

When it comes time to choose how to help a loved one care for themselves, the decision can be a difficult one. How will you know what’s right for them (and everyone else involved)?

We’ve found that often, people both young and old prefer to receive care at home.

  • Most individuals are more comfortable at home, surrounded by family and friends who can offer emotional support
  • Home care allows for a more personal relationship with the caregiver
  • Clients can remain independent, rather than hand over all control to nursing home professionals
  • In home care is typically less expensive than nursing facilities or hospitals 

What is the Role of a Home Aide? 

A home aide provides basic services such as medication reminders, transportation to and from appointments, meal planning and preparation, and family respite. They travel to the client’s own home. Often, their assistance is a big part of what allows the person to continue living in their own home.

Duties provided by a home aide vary depending on the needs of the client. Examples include:

  • Light housekeeping tasks such as washing dishes, vacuuming, and folding laundry
  • Transportation for errands, appointments, and social outings
  • Healthy and delicious meals cooked right in the client’s own kitchen
  • Safety supervision and fall risk assessment
  • Ensure all medication is taken at the correct time every day

Celebrating Our Home Health Aides 

All of us at ComForCare Home Care join in applauding and thanking home care aides everywhere for the amazing work they do. These workers are some of the most dedicated and compassionate health care providers in the field. No less than doctors, nurses or first responders, HHAs save lives.

Thank you, home care aides! Your work is vital.

Posted in: Home Care

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Gathering Safely for the Holidays

Monday , November 2 , 2020

Gathering Safely for the Holidays

The holiday season is upon us! With Thanksgiving and a slew of other holidays right around the corner, you may be wondering, “How can I safely visit my family and friends?”

Experts say think small. During the worst pandemic in a century, things will look a bit different this year.

So how do you plan a special celebration during such a challenging time? Keep reading to learn more:

Plan for smaller holiday gatherings 

The best advice experts can offer at this time is stay at home whenever possible. Plan for a family Zoom call, an online game night, or even a holiday drive-by in your car.

But if you absolutely must see your loved ones in person, keep it small.

The CDC tips for a safe holiday gathering include:

  • Limit the number of attendees as much as possible to allow people from different households to remain at least 6 feet apart at all times. Guests should avoid direct contact, including handshakes and hugs, with others not from their household.
  • Avoid holding gatherings in crowded, poorly ventilated spaces with persons who are not in your household.
  • Increase ventilation by opening windows and doors to the extent that is safe and feasible based on the weather, or by placing central air and heating on continuous circulation.
  • Require guests to wear masks. At gatherings that include persons of different households, everyone should always wear a mask that covers both the mouth and nose, except when eating or drinking.
  • Plan ahead and ask guests to avoid contact with people outside of their households for 14 days before the gathering.

Large gatherings make it too difficult to enforce rules and maintain social distancing. Unless you want your holiday party to become the next super spreader event, keep it to a minimum!

Opt Outside

Even better? If you want to meet up with a group of people who don’t live in your household, gather outside!

It may be cold out in the coming weeks, but that’s nothing that can’t be overcome. Dress in layers, add a hat and gloves, and bring a blanket to cover your lap. You can even gather around an outdoor fireplace or patio heater, as long as you maintain social distancing and wear masks.

If weather forces you into a tent or pop-up shelter, consider keeping one side open for ventilation.

To keep food as safe as possible, encourage guests to “B.Y.O.M” (bring your own meat) and cook it over the grill or fire.

Protect Yourself and Others

No matter how you gather, remember: Safety first. The holidays are not the time to start ignoring the safety protocol you’ve observed for the rest of the year.

Remind guests to:

  • Wash hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available.
  • Wear a mask and maintain a six-foot distance from people outside your household
  • Avoid handshakes, hugs, and even elbow bumps
  • Stay home if you are sick

Keep in mind that you are not obligated to gather with anyone. If you receive any invitations that make you even the tiniest bit uncomfortable, exercise your right to say “no.”

Who Should Avoid Gatherings? 

According to the CDC, the following people should avoid all gatherings this holiday season. Anyone who:

  • Has or was exposed to Covid-19
  • Has been diagnosed with Covid-19 and has not met the criteria for when it is safe to be around others
  • Has symptoms associated with Covid-19
  • Is waiting for Covid-19 test results
  • Is at increased risk of severe illness from Covid-19

Final Thoughts 

If you are an older adult or person whose medical conditions leave you at greater risk of severe infection, you should avoid ALL in-person gatherings.

If you are celebrating with friends and loved ones, help drive infection rates down! Wear a mask, wash hands, practice social distancing, and avoid large groups.

Have a safe and healthy holiday season!

Posted in: Health

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Over 50? This is Why You Need the Shingles Vaccine.

Monday , October 26 , 2020

Over 50? This is Why You Need the Shingles Vaccine.

These days, everyone is talking about a vaccine for Covid-19. When will it arrive? Will it be effective? Will it be safe for everyone?

But we have something else on our minds: Shingles.

For older adults, the risk of developing the rash increases with age. Other factors, such as being infected with chickenpox early in life or being immuncompromised, also add to the risk.

That’s why experts recommend that anyone over the age of 50 receive the shingles vaccine.

Keep reading to learn more about shingles and how you can protect yourself:

What is Shingles? 

According to the CDC, shingles usually develops as a stripe across one side of the body or face. People may feel pain, itching, or tingling for a few days before the rash actually appears. Other symptoms may include fever, chills, headache, and upset stomach.

A few days after the rash appears, it turns into fluid-filled blisters, like chickenpox. They usually scab up after 7 – 10 days and will fully clear up a few weeks after that.

Even after the painful rash has died down, the after affects can be even worse.

The most common complaint post-shingles is something called postherpetic neuralgia – nerve pain at the site of the rash that typically lasts for 90 days or more.

Dr. David Hrncir, an allergist-immunologist at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, says, “The older you are when you get shingles, the more likely it is you’ll develop post-herpetic neuralgia, or PHN, and have longer-lasting and severe pain. The pain is not easily treated. So you’re left with constant pain that can significantly affect quality of life.”

A less common complication involves the eyes and can result in pain, scarring, and (in rare cases) vision loss.

Who’s at Risk?

Who’s in danger of developing shingles? Anyone who’s had chickenpox, though those who experienced the virus before 18-months are at higher risk.

Shingles is an activation of the varicella zoster virus, the same bug that causes chickenpox. After chickenpox clears, the virus lays dormant in your body for the rest of your life. Although it’s not clear why, the virus may reactivate many years later as shingles.

Experts say that 1 in 3 people will develop shingles in their lifetime, usually after the age of 50. Though some younger adults do develop the illness, it’s far less common.

If you do have shingles, direct contact with the fluid from a blister can cause infection in other people, even those who have not had chickenpox. The risk of spreading the virus is low if you keep the blisters covered.

Vaccine Options

Up until the summer of 2020, there were two options for the shingles vaccine: Zostovax and Shingrix.

Shingrix was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2017 and is the preferred alternative to Zostovax, which was approved in 2006.

Both vaccines are approved for adults over the age of 50 for the prevention of shingles, whether you’ve already had the virus or not. Here’s how they’re different:

  • Zostovax is a live vaccine given as a single injection, usually in the upper arm, and has been shown to offer protection against shingles for up to five years. As of July 2020, Zostovax is no longer available in the U.S., but may be available in other countries.

  • Shingrix is a nonliving vaccine made of a virus component. It’s given in two doses, two to six months apart. Studies show that Shingrix provides protection against shingles beyond five years, and it is recommended for adults over 50, even if they’ve already received Zostovax.

The most common side effects of either vaccine are redness, tenderness, swelling, and itching at the site of injection. Some people report getting a mild chickenpox-like rash.

The CDC offers recommendations about people who should not get the shingles vaccine.

Good to know: Shingrix costs about $280 for both shots combined. Medicare covers Shingrix under Part D.

Final Thoughts

If you’re considering getting the shingles vaccine, talk to your doctor about the possible risks and benefits in your specific situation. For more information, go to www.cdc.gov/vaccines.

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